Easter Bread – Casatiello Napoletano

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One week to Easter so it’s definitely time for egg decoration, chocolate and lots of picnics.

This Easter recipe I am sharing with you today is typical from Naples, in Italy. It’s a very rich and nutritional dish made with bacon, cheese and hard boiled eggs.

For the bread the traditional recipe calls for a salty dough made with shortening, I prefer using my pan brioche recipe, reducing the amount of sugar to make it not sweet.

Let me know if you like it!

Ingredients:

for the dough

  • 50 g + 200 g flour
  • 2 tsp instant yeast
  • 20 g + 1 tbsp sugar
  • 60 ml + 40 ml whole fat milk
  • 45 g unsalted butter
  • 2 eggs

for the filling

  • 1/2 cup bacon, chopped
  • 1/4 cup cheddar cheese
  • 3 tbsp Parmesan cheese

for decoration

  • sprinkles
  • 4 hard-boiled eggs

Let’s start off with the sponge. Heat up 60 ml milk to lukewarm, then add yeast and 1 tbsp of sugar, stir it and let it stand on your counter for about 10 min or until it becomes all freaky and bubbling. Next up, add 50 g of flour and stir it until smooth

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Cover with plastic wrap and let it rest for 30 min

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In a separate bowl combine 200 g flour, 20 g sugar, the sponge and 1 egg

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Add the melted butter and with your mixer on low, slowly pour in the remaining milk. Knead the dough until it gets soft and smooth (about 10 min).

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Transfer it to a greased bowl, cover with plastic wrap and let it rest for  2 hours or until doubled in size

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Cut off a small piece of dough

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then roll up the rest  into a rectangular. Chop up the bacon

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and distribute it all over the dough

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then sprinkle the Parmesan cheese and the chopped cheddar

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Roll up the into a long snake shape

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and place it into a well greased ring-shaped cake pan

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Beat up the egg and lightly brush the top of the bread, then place 4 eggs on top. Roll the remaining dough and cut out 8 half cm thick strips, place 2 strips in a cross on top of each egg. Brush again with the egg, then sprinkle with colorful sprinkles.

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Bake at 160 C (180 C for static oven) for about 40-45 min. Remove and let the bread cool down on a wire rack.

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Slice it up and serve cold

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Love

- LittleDani

 

About the author:

An Italian living in China with a strong passion for cooking! Browse my 'left-overs' session for many tasty grub!. Follow her on Twitter / Facebook.

  • Angel

    When is this traditional eaten ? As in is it made during Holy Thursday to be Saturday or. Made for Easter Sunday morning?
    Why the sprinkles? Curious
    Greek in Australia Cheers
    PS looks delicious

    • http://www.expatcucina.com/ Dani

      HI angel, my family makes it the day after Easter as it is tradition in Italy to go have a picnic with friends and this s practical and tasty to bring around.

  • Daniela

    What you have made it is called “Danubio” or “Brioche rustica” and not Casatiello. The Danubio, again typical of Napoli,it is made with brioche dough and it is stuffed with ham, cheese but not decorated with eggs.
    The Casatiello Napoletano is eggless and it is made with bread dough and lard ( or butter as substitute) and a lots of pepper and stuffed with local cheese and cured meat and decorated with eggs; unless this is the Casatiello Casertano which it is made with egg and sugar and lard and it is decorated with rainbow sugar sprinkles but it does not call for a stuffing of ham, cheese or eggs for decorations. I would never call a rose with an other name what should you?

    • http://www.expatcucina.com/ Dani

      Dear Daniela,
      thanks for the long and detailed explanation. However, Casatiello is well known in Italy for its numerous variations as every family makes it in its own way. This s how my mom makes it!
      Lot’s of love from Shanghai :)

      • Daniela

        Dear Daniela,
        There are many regional dishes in Italy which may be similar and may be I am a purist when it comes to recipe, napoletani recipes, but i would never call focaccia barese “genovese” or amaretti sardi :pasta di mandorla siciliana. Each regio, each city, each quartiere in Italy is proud to have its own recipes, to name them with pride, like altamura bread o cassata siciliana o brioche catanese etc….and who are we to take this away from them.May be casatiello napoletano is not a d.o.c. or d.o.p. but it is sure since XVI century that it was made with bread dough. This is not a casatiello napoletano. please don’t mislead people in believing wrong.

        • http://www.expatcucina.com/ Dani

          http://ricette.giallozafferano.it/Casatiello-napoletano.html

          It seems like I am not the only one to call it a Casatiello…and if you search on line you will have many many other variation.
          You know what I like about cooking? Being free and flexible of adding and modifying recipes as I like.
          Smile Daniela. Life is good! No need to be a teacher all the time. :p

          • Daniela

            Dear Daniela,
            Be o not be a teacher is not the point and life is always good when you never stop learning, as Socrate said once. I do understand the creativity a the freedom that cooking gives you and all of us out there with or without a blog, but changing some ingredients it is very different on changing the basic and using still the same name.
            I do not need to search on-line because not all the stuff published may be true or close to be true. Casatiello napoletano is p.a.t product which means there is a d.ds. and sub which regulate the productions of it, the place and list the ingredients necessary for a dough to be called casatiello napoletano. You can call your recipe casatiello, casatiello pugliese italian easter bread but for sure not napoletano.
            Sometimes be a black sheep is better than be part of the flock.